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Enfield supports Fair Trade

Published on:

26 April 2017

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It’s World Fair Trade Day on Saturday 13 May and Enfield Council is marking the date by outlining its commitment to using Fair Trade merchandise such as bananas, chocolate, pineapples and coffee in thousands of meals every day.

It’s World Fair Trade Day on Saturday 13 May and Enfield Council is marking the date by outlining its commitment to using Fair Trade merchandise such as bananas, chocolate, pineapples and coffee in thousands of meals every day

Enfield has been a Fair Trade borough since September 2008, with both the Enfield Catering Service – which serves 20,000 meals a day to hungry youngsters - and the staff canteen, Millfield Theatre and the Dugdale Centre all using Fair Trade products.

The Fairtrade Foundation developed the idea of Fair Trade Day to help provide better prices for goods, ensuring decent working conditions and fair terms of trade for farmers and workers.

Fair Trade works to benefit small-scale farmers and workers, who are amongst the most marginalised groups globally, through trade instead of aid to help them to maintain their livelihoods and reach their potential.

Cllr Alan Sitkin, Enfield Council’s Cabinet Member for Economic Regeneration & Business, said: “The Fair Trade movement is growing as people realise that they can help alleviate poverty and protect the environment by choosing Fair Trade products.

“When you buy Fair Trade products you can guarantee that the farmers who have worked hard to grow them get a minimum price. Fairtrade is a way of giving regular support – while enjoying high quality products at the same time. We have a moral responsibility to pay a fair price for the goods we consume rather than exploit workers in the Third World for the sake of a bargain.  

“By participating in this international movement Enfield Council is playing its part not only in fighting poverty among world farmers but also in ensuring a more equitable distribution of value added up and down certain global supply chains – a focus that is not only ethically justified but also economically efficient.”

To find out more contact: The Fairtrade Foundation at Link