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Essential restoration begins on park war memorial

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19 July 2017

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The refurbishment of a much-loved remembrance garden in Broomfield Park, Palmers Green, is well under way following a successful application for funding from The War Memorials Trust, submitted in collaboration with the Friends of Broomfield Park.

- War Memorials Trust awards £64,000 to Broomfield Park Remembrance Garden
- Refurbishment is underway and expected to finish in time for Remembrance Day
- 2018 marks the 100th anniversary of the end of World War One
 
The refurbishment of a much-loved remembrance garden in Broomfield Park, Palmers Green, is well under way following a successful application for funding from The War Memorials Trust.
 
The Trust awarded Enfield Council £64,000 to refurbish a number of features within the Remembrance Garden. The application was submitted in collaboration with the Friends of Broomfield Park
 
Enfield Council’s Cabinet Member for Environment, Cllr Daniel Anderson, said: “We are very grateful to The War Memorials Trust and the Friends of Broomfield Park for their help in protecting this significant memorial in one of our most popular parks.
 
"Enfield Council believes in the importance of forging strong communities and the value of local history to that end.
 
“Next year marks 100 years since the end of the Great War, so this renovation comes at a very appropriate time.”
 
The war memorial takes the form of a small temple set in a walled garden. Its original incarnation was unveiled in July 1929. The work includes the restoration of the roof of the temple, re-laying paved areas and refurbishment of the fountain in the pond. Handrails have also been installed to assist with access to the raised areas. The renovation is expected to be completed by September.
 
The Remembrance Garden is a perfect place for contemplation and relaxation and includes some fascinating features. The temple contains three impressed small windows indicative of Fortitude, Sacrifice and Victory. There are four granite tablets on the temple’s walls with the names of 525 men from the armed forces who died fighting overseas in World War One. A cairn can be found at the front of the temple with each stone representing a life laid down.
 
In 1948 the war memorial was extended and two further granite tablets were added containing the names of the 573 people from Enfield who died in World War Two, including 134 names of civilians.
 
The garden also has a bench made from the timbers from the former HMS Dido, which took part in several battles across the Mediterranean and Arctic during World War II, and the remains of a stone birdbath presented by the civic branch of the League of Nations. A large variety of plants adorn the garden.
 
The War Memorials Trust works for the protection and conservation of war memorials in the UK. Information on the work they do, grants and learning materials can be found here. Find out about parks and open spaces in Enfield on the Council’s website .