Facebook Campaign enables us to measure response and retarget from campaigns we run on Facebook and Instagram

Fair trade supports a fairer world

Published on:

11 May 2016

Share this article:

It’s World Fair Trade Day on Saturday 14 May and as a foretaste of what the day is about Enfield Council is displaying a selection of Fair Trade produce sold in its venues and used by the school catering service on Thursday 12 May.

It’s World Fair Trade Day on Saturday 14 May and as a foretaste of what the day is about Enfield Council is displaying a selection of Fair Trade produce sold in its venues and used by the school catering service on Thursday 12 May.

Enfield became a Fair Trade borough in September 2008 and its status was renewed in October 2014.

Cllr Alan Sitkin, Enfield Council’s Cabinet Member for Economic Regeneration & Business, said: “Fair Trade ensures that farmers throughout the world get a fair price for their produce and can maintain a decent standard of living for their families.

“Many food stores and major supermarkets in our borough stock Fair Trade food – most notably: tea, coffee, chocolate and bananas and I am delighted that Enfield Council is taking a lead through its catering services.

“Fair Trade goods and produce include: gold, cotton, wine, flowers, nuts, rice, sugar and soft drinks and there are 5,000 certified fair trade products in the UK.

“Enfield is one of over 1,000 UK towns supporting Fair Trade and with accreditation our aim is to continue promoting the sale of fairly-traded products within the borough.

“By participating in this international movement we are playing our part not only in fighting poverty among world farmers but also in ensuring a more equitable distribution of value added up and down certain global supply chains – a focus that is not only ethically justified but also economically efficient.”

World Fair Trade Day is an inclusive worldwide festival of events celebrating Fair Trade as a tangible contribution to the fight against poverty and exploitation, climate change and the economic crises that has the greatest impact on the world’s most vulnerable populations.

Fair Trade benefits the most vulnerable and delivers sustainable livelihoods by developing opportunities for small and disadvantaged producers.

Millions of producers and traders, businesses and policy-makers, supporting organizations and volunteers have contributed to the substantial growth of Fair Trade globally.

To find out more contact the Fairtrade Foundation on 020 7405 5942 or visit their website.

Ten Food Facts from the Fair Trade Foundation

  1. The World Food Summit of 1996 defined that “food security exists when all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food that meets their dietary needs and preferences for an active life.”  
  2. Food security is built on four pillars: food availability; food access; food use; and food stability. When one of these pillars is unstable or non-existent, people can live in a state of food insecurity.
  3. 500 million small farms provide up to 80 per cent of food for most of the developing world. An estimated 400 million smallholder farmers are undernourished.
  4. In the world's main tea-producing regions, more than 30 per cent of children are malnourished. In Malawi, this rises to 50 per cent. 
  5. Poverty and drought are the most common causes of food shortages in the world.
  6. 65 per cent of cocoa farmers in Cote D'Ivoire lack enough resources for food during July and August. 80 per cent live on less than 40p a day per person.  
  7. Smallholder coffee farmers in three Central American countries were found to have no guarantee of food security for 3-4 months every year.
  8. Around the world, periods of hunger are so acute for many farmers they have acquired their own names for it.
  9. In September 2015, 193 UN member states agreed to 17 goals, known as the Global Goals. Goal 2 aims to end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture.
  10. Fairtrade provides a safety net for world’s poorest farmers against volatile market prices and the Fairtrade Premium - often a vital resource to support food security and diversification. Gottingen University found that farmers' incomes on Fairtrade-certified farms in Uganda have risen by 30 per cent.