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Residents warned to guard against coronavirus conmen (and women)

Published on:

27 November 2020

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Enfield Council is warning the public to be vigilant for scams and cons.

With more people finding themselves in vulnerable financial situations than ever before because of the coronavirus crisis, Enfield Council is warning the public to be vigilant for scams and cons.

With extensive job losses and many people facing reduced income this year, the heightened uncertainty and anxiety caused by the pandemic has made people more financially vulnerable and more likely to fall victim to a scam that could see them losing even more money.

Enfield Council’s Cabinet Member for Licensing and Regulatory Services, Cllr George Savva, said: “In the run up to the festive season and in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic, it is likely people will have less money than they usually would and might feel under pressure to provide for a normal Christmas so they could be more susceptible to being scammed.

“I want residents to think really carefully before they hand money over for goods or services, especially if any deal seems too good to be true. You don’t want to be out of pocket if you are already struggling financially, and you especially don’t want to make a conman’s Christmas at the expense of your own.”

You can find out about the latest scams and how to spot them through Citizens Advice online scam helper tool at https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/consumer/scams/check-if-something-might-be-a-scam/

Enfield Council’s Trading Standards team warns it might be a scam if:

• it seems too good to be true – for example, a holiday that’s much cheaper than you’d expect
• someone you don’t know contacts you unexpectedly
• you suspect you’re not dealing with a real company – for example, if there’s no postal address
• you’ve been asked to transfer money quickly
• you've been asked to pay in an unusual way – for example, by iTunes vouchers or through a transfer service like MoneyGram or Western Union
• you’ve been asked to give away personal information like passwords or PINs
• you haven't had written confirmation of what's been agreed