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Tell the story of your community with a local heritage project

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18 October 2019

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Enfield’s Heritage Strategy, which celebrates the borough’s rich cultural history, diversity and plans for growth has been officially launched with an evening of entertainment.

Enfield’s Heritage Strategy, which celebrates the borough’s rich cultural history, diversity and plans for growth has been officially launched with an evening of entertainment.

Janet Kay, the first British born female Reggae artist to have a UK number one hit rounded off the night where the National Lottery Heritage Fund also announced that Enfield will be a funding focus area.

This means local groups will get essential support to research and share the history of a community or a place and fund heritage projects. Enfield is one of just 13 areas in the U.K. and three in London identified as having received the least funding in the past.

Enfield Council’s Deputy Leader, Cllr Ian Barnes, said: “Heritage is about what people value and want to preserve for future generations. However this is not just about buildings and monuments – although they too are important. It’s also about giving recognition to our diverse and culturally significant communities, singing the praises of local heroes, marking important moments in history and giving thanks to those who can demonstrate how heritage can make people, places and the local economy thrive.”

Cllr Barnes was one of many guests who were given a flavour of what Enfield has to offer at the official launch of the Heritage Strategy at the Dugdale Centre on 15 October. A special performance was given by Janet Kay, a long-term Edmonton resident who sang her 1979 hit ‘Silly Games’. The performance was given extra resonance as Enfield is currently celebrating the contribution of the black community during Black History Month.

The Local Studies Service and Museum provided exhibits, including a fragment of a famous mural from Broomfield House, depicting the goddess Minerva which has been conserved with a grant from The Enfield Society. A short film from the borough’s archives was shown, including scenes from the borough’s proud industrial past. There were powerful readings by local poets Keith Mowatt and Anthony Fisher and an opportunity to visit the Enfield at War 1939-45 exhibition.

Cllr Barnes added: “As we move forward with our Heritage Strategy and Local Plan proposals, we will ensure our plans are fully inclusive and strike a balance between conservation and much-needed growth, with communities at the heart of any proposals.” Anyone interested in contributing an idea for a local heritage project should contact heritage@enfield.gov.uk between now and 15 January 2020, using the subject line ‘Call for Projects’.